‘Interstellar’ a Futuristic Voyage of Hope

eft to right: Matthew McConaughey, Anne Hathaway, and David Gyasi in INTERSTELLAR, from Paramount Pictures and Warner Brothers Pictures, in association with Legendary Pictures.
eft to right: Matthew McConaughey, Anne Hathaway, and David Gyasi in INTERSTELLAR, from Paramount Pictures and Warner Brothers Pictures, in association with Legendary Pictures.
Left to right: Matthew McConaughey, Anne Hathaway, and David Gyasi in INTERSTELLAR, from Paramount Pictures and Warner Brothers Pictures, in association with Legendary Pictures.

HOLLYWOOD-The journey that Christopher Nolan’s futuristic film “Interstellar” takes us on is one that pose many questions about humanity, the quest for space exploration, a real, in-depth look at family dynamics and how do we survive a possible ruination of the environment around us.

“Interstellar” is a fascinating film that makes you wonder and really think hard about the future and what it has in store for the generations to come long after the curtains have come down and the since movie concluded. It is a movie that is hard to turn away from and ignore.

It is also a film that hits the right buttons as far as touching on the immediate and daily confrontation that rural America and farmers must contend with in engaging with fast approaching detonation of their world. The evolution of man’s onward trajectory of exploring new windows to another world not called our own has always been an attractive idea.

“Interstellar” brings this home in many ways. This is a must-see film.

On so many levels does “Interstellar” resonates with you that one begins to ponder the existence of mankind and the likelihood that it may, inevitably, come to an end should we not pursue of avenues of life beyond this planet.

David Gyasi in INTERSTELLAR, from Paramount Pictures and Warner Brothers Entertainment, in association with Legendary Pictures.
David Gyasi in INTERSTELLAR, from Paramount Pictures and Warner Brothers Entertainment, in association with Legendary Pictures.

The star power of making all of this come to the beautiful light is Matthew McConaughey, Anne Hawthaway, Michael Caine and David Gyasi. All films have to have a pilot that audiences can count on to guide them through the film, and McConaughey is that guy in “Interstellar.”  The characters are all strong in their respective roles. McConaughey, who won an Oscar for his role in Dallas Buyers Club, interjects his role with plenty of energy and thespian validation in “Interstellar” as Cooper, a gung-ho farmer turned NASA adventurer who travels to outer space to find another planet that would help ensure man’s survival.

As great as McConaughey is in this film, the crux of success the movie on how it manages to sustain itself is through the well-played characters emphasized by Hathaway, Caine, Gyasi, John Lithgow, Matt Damon and Mackenzie Foy (Murph). Hathaway, as Dr. Amelia Brand, compliments McConaughey’s character with earthly balance to Cooper’s relentless zeal to explore. While Cooper tends to go at things 100 mph, Dr. Brand is stable and lends practicality in the film’s highlighted mission to save humanity in the latest of space movies seeking answers to the great unknown.

Ever since American Neil Armstrong and his crew of astronauts touched down on the moon in 1969, the allure of seeking life on other planets have been an overwhelming fascination for those of us here on Earth. Besides the excellent acting being displayed in “Interstellar,” what separates  this movie from other space exploration jaunts is Nolan’s grittier, real-life approach to all of this madness from the heart of America.

You have a farm community whose mere existence is being constantly threatened by the environment as dust bowls rise up to destroy their crops with each passing year, and it becomes more and more unbearable to take. Cooper winds up being recruited by Professor Brand (Caine) to help do something about the problem. Save the world is what Professor Brand wants Cooper to do. Cooper obliges and the adventure begins with Dr. Brand (Hathaway) and astrophysicist Romilly (played by Gyasi) in tow.

Gyasi’s character Romilly is one of the more intriguing roles in the film. Though there could have been a bit more dialogue from Romilly, the character’s strong background presence keeps things evenly keel as he roams about as the thinking scientist always at work to help the crew navigate its way through their solar system mission with clarity and purpose.  There’s always have to a smart guy in the room. Well, Romilly is that guy that both Cooper and Dr. Brand depend on through their space journey.

But what really makes this film truly click is Nolan’s straight-laced approach of man’s dream to conquer space, while at the same time, deal and confront its neglectful pollution of this planet. Nothing brings this home with more emphasis of humanity than the inter-working dynamics between Cooper and Murph. While Cooper  revels in the opportunity of going into space and trying to save mankind, Murph  (played splendidly by Foy) just wants her father to be around.

Murph is a daddy’s girl, a child whose father is her hero. Murph shares the same love for adventure and space stuff as Cooper. However, having gone through losing her mother, Murph is afraid she may not see her dad again should he choose space over his her. Nolan plays this well, and the seen and unseen banter between father and daughter that goes on throughout the movie serves as a powerful backdrop to an already strong script. And “Interstellar” is a better film because of it.

Dennis J. Freeman
About Dennis J. Freeman 1083 Articles
Dennis covers the NFL (San Diego Chargers), NBA (Los Angeles Clippers, Los Angeles Lakers), Major League Baseball (Los Angeles Dodgers) and NCAA sports (USC, UCLA, Long Beach State). As a professional journalist, Dennis has also covered and written on topics such as civil rights, politics and social justice. Dennis is a graduate of Howard University.