Seahawks’ Super Stupid Call

Seattle quarterback Russell Wilson and coach Pete Carroll made the wrong call at the goal line.
Seattle quarterback Russell Wilson and coach Pete Carroll made the wrong call at the goal line.
Seattle quarterback Russell Wilson and coach Pete Carroll made the wrong call at the goal line.

There is stupid. Then there is the level of stupidity that the Seattle Seahawks navigated at the end of their Super Bowl contest against the New England Patriots. The stupid and almost unforgivable mistake I am talking about is what Pop Warner, high school of college football coaches wouldn’t make at the end of a football game.

As a result, Seattle lose to New England, 28-24. Darrell Bevell, please stand up and shows us your stupid card and turn in your OC badge. Bevell, operating in disguise as the offensive coordinator for the Seahawks, should be fired for his unintelligent decision that cost Seattle back-to-back Super Bowls.

First, let’s start with the obvious. With the ball at the one-yard line, one timeout and 26 ticks left to go in the Super Bowl, Bevell and his operating genius decided to dismiss winning the game with the Beast Mode call to running back Marshawn Lynch that would drive home the Seahawks with back-to-back wins as champions of the National Football League. Well, cancel that script.

It seemed like a fairly obvious call to anyone watching the game. Give it to the best running back in the league and Seattle was sure to be dancing all the way to the 2015 season. But for some reason or another, Bevell suffered a brain freeze and opted to have quarterback Russell Wilson to try and win the game with his arm. Bad mistake.

Wilson’s throw on a slant route was picked off at the goal line. Ballgame. Bevell just handed Tom Brady his fourth Super Bowl win with the dumbest play call in the history of the game. I will try to cut Bevell some slack, but it hard to so because at the end of the day, it was a stupid call. Plain and simple. Football is a simple game.

It is stupid people like Bevell that makes the game more complicated than it really is with butt-ignorant calls. And taking Bevell’s colossal stupidity to yet another level is hearing the man who called the ill-fated play blame the wide receiver for not attacking the route hard enough. Wow! How do you call the stupidest plain in the annals of football and speak arrogantly enough to blame the receive for not scoring?

Some of the onus falls Wilson as well. What is the worst thing that could have happened if Wilson decides to call some form of audible to run another and more logical play for the Seahawks to try and execute, say like giving the ball to Lynch? Or why not throw the ball low enough where only the receiver catches the ball? Seattle would still have two more plays to close the deal, plus with a timeout in their backpocket. The Seahawks were in prime position t celebrate one more Super Bowl victory.

That was negated by Bevell’s stupid decision. And judging by the way Twitter has blown up over Bevell’s all-time blunder, many people feel the same way I feel.  That would include former and current NFL players and rambling teenagers who are smart enough to know that was a buster call by Bevell. Pop Warner caches know better than to call that wack play.

I can’t even imagine how the defensive unit of the Seahawks  feel right about now.  For once, it was the offense turn to win a game, blunders all around made that impossible. Bevell got real conservative after the Seahawks had taken a 24-14 third quarter lead. Instead of mixing it up, Bevell and his crew became one dimensional and sat on the ball until Tom Brady got his groove back. But by then it was too late. The wheel routes to Lynch was open all game, long before Wilson hit the running back out of the backfield for a long completion on the final drive of the game.

It’s too bad that Bevell and Wilson didn’t make that connection with Lynch one yard from victory. But when you have hamhocks for brains, being Super Stupid can cause you lose sleep and a Super Bowl.

Dennis J. Freeman
About Dennis J. Freeman 1076 Articles
Dennis covers the NFL (San Diego Chargers), NBA (Los Angeles Clippers, Los Angeles Lakers), Major League Baseball (Los Angeles Dodgers) and NCAA sports (USC, UCLA, Long Beach State). As a professional journalist, Dennis has also covered and written on topics such as civil rights, politics and social justice. Dennis is a graduate of Howard University.