Prep Spotlight: Rancho Dominguez Prep Play the Line Game

Rancho Dominguez Prep offensive linemen Stanley Pese (58) and Andreus Carter (52) are a reflection of good quality line play with the CIF Los Angeles City Section.
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Rancho Dominguez Prep offensive linemen Stanley Pese (58) and Andreus Carter (52) are a reflection of good quality line play with the CIF Los Angeles City Section.

The CIF Los Angeles City Section’s football division is well-known for all of its high-profile athletic talent. That talent usually comprises of athletes making a name for themselves at skilled positions such as wide receiver, running or at defensive back. In short, speed kills. It also will help you get a college scholarship if you’re able to run with the wind.

Most City Section teams do that quite well. What is often overlooked in this arena is the importance of an offensive line that makes all of these skilled guys look good. The offensive line is typically a group no one messes around with. Not even their teammates on the defensive side of the ball want anything to do with them.

That’s because they are usually a nasty bunch, a group of guys who have no problem smacking you in the mouth with pitbull intentions and then politely ask you if you’re okay afterwards.

The offensive is the anchor of any team. It is not the most glamorized position in football. In fact, being an offensive lineman comes within the territory of being incognito or not being noticed too much outside of pancaking a defensive player on his backside.

They are a ruthless group these offensive linemen.

They are not afraid of anything or anybody on the football field. Off they field, they are gentle giants. On the field, offensive linemen becomes a nightmarish ball of unleashed fury. They put on their hard hats and bring their lunch pails with them every practice to go to work, a line of employment circulated on knocking opponents around silly like putty.

The offensive line on any football team formulate the identity of their squad. They can either be soft as jello or tough as nails. They are the bodyguards that keep their offensive backfield out of harm’s way. So goes the offensive line, so goes the rest of the team.

Rancho Dominguez running back John Dill looks to follow center Edward Mollard in a pregame drill.
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Rancho Dominguez running back John Dill looks to follow center Edward Mollard in a pregame drill.

The Rancho Dominguez Prep football team have the potential to make some real noise during the rest of their nonleague schedule and in the  Coliseum League this season with their massive size up front. The offensive line takes more time to come together and play with peak efficiency than any other unit on the field.

But once they get on the same page, lookout. The Lobos, despite constant change in the makeup of the starting rotation of the offensive line this season, have the potential of becoming really, really good in this area.  Let’s just start with the size of these young men that Lobos coach Wayne Crawford has to work with.

Where’s the beef? Well, the Lobos certainly have it with 6-foot-4 Bacari Jackson, 6-foot-4 Anthony Owens, 6-foot-4 Daniel Hopson, 6-foot, 240 pounds Andreus Carter, 6-foot, 225 pounds Edward Mollard, 6-foot-2, 245 pounds Stanley Pese and Abraham Castaneda.

The Lobos’ offensive linemen are still finding their way around in the trenches, but are already making an impact against opponents. They are the reason that running back Isaiah Black has already rushed for a team-leading 385 yards through the Lobos’ first three games.  The Lobos have rushed for 587 yards as a team through its first three contests. And they are bound to get even better as the season goes along.

The next three games will provide a stiff challenge for the Lobos with games against Banning, Gardena and then against Dorsey to open up Coliseum League play. As a second year program, the Lobos are much further along than they were last year. Part of opposing team’s advantage over the Lobos last season was inexperience at the offensive line position.

That is not the case this year. Sure, the Lobos have a couple of young guys in the mix now, but for the most part they are a year wiser, stronger and better.  That translate into this current group of offensive linemen being a bit more nastier and a bit more ornery. That usually spells trouble for the opposition.

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